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Hydrogen is gaining importance in recent times!

Nespresso is now making deliveries in Switzerland with hydrogen-powered trucks built by Hyundai Hydrogen Mobility. Alpiq in Gösgen, Switzerland, filled them with green hydrogen produced using clean hydropower. Pierre Logez, Nespresso’s logistics manager, says in a statement, “Thanks to this revolutionary eco-mobile technology, it is possible to reduce CO2 emission by transporting our Nespresso coffees and products. Next time you are on the road, look out because you might just spot our beautiful Nespresso green hydrogen truck.”

This is notable because there have been long complaints that coffee pods are the poster child for unsustainable design. So, for many years, Nespresso has done everything with recycling programs they could to greenwash them, turning them into art. But, unfortunately, it takes a lot of material and energy to package a spoonful of coffee. And most of them go to the incinerator and the dump because the operative word here was convenience.

Now on the hydrogen bandwagon, Nespresso has hopped, which seems to be happening all over Europe. The German Government has just announced that 62 hydrogen projects are investing $9.78 million. Germany’s energy minister Peter Altmaier said that they want to become number one in a press release in Hydrogen technologies. Germany’s federal transport minister, Andreas Scheuer, says: They want to make Germany a Hydrogen country. They are rethinking mobility from the energy system and drive technologies to the fueling infrastructure.

Created by Adrian Hiel of Energy Cities, Liebreich expands on the energy ladder, indicating that hydrogen makes sense for lots of things. For example, it can be used to make ammonia for fertilizers, replace coke in steel production, powering cars and vans, and domestic heating.

A recent report produced by the Corporate Europe Observatory and other nonprofits explains the forces pushing for hydrogen, which includes blue hydrogen made from natural gas. It was found by them the hydrogen lobby, whose leading players are fossil gas companies, declared a combined annual expenditure of €58.6 million trying to influence Brussels policy-making.

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