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Here’s how the gut recovers following a rotavirus infection.

Here's how the gut recovers following a rotavirus infection.

Researchers from Baylor College of Medicine discovered that healing the gut after rotavirus infection requires cellular cooperation. The study’s findings are in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences publication.

The injured epithelium has a range of cell types engaged in healing it through wide coordinated responses that finally cure the damaged tissue. According to a thorough single-cell analytical technique used to analyze the repair process in an animal model. In addition to enterocytes, they are also commonly infected by rotavirus. The researchers observed that tuft cells, another cell type in the intestinal epithelium. They are also infected and may contribute to the epithelium’s repair response after injury.

Here's how the gut recovers following a rotavirus infection.

The discoveries not only provide researchers a greater knowledge of how the body heals after rotavirus infection, but they may also reveal new information about how the virus causes sickness. Each year, nearly 60 million Americans suffer from digestive system diseases. These conditions also lead to epithelial damage. It also compromises the epithelium’s functions. They are food digestion and nutrient absorption and have an impact on overall health. Dr. Sarah Blutt, associate professor of molecular virology and microbiology at Baylor, is a co-corresponding author.

This is the first report of single-cell transcript characterization following an intestine human virus infection, which excites me much. We believe this is a significant repository of information for gastrointestinal researchers who want to examine how each cell type reacts in the setting of a viral infection, said Blutt. Dr. Mary Estes, Cullen Chair and professor of molecular virology and microbiology at Baylor, said, “I believe that this technique will bring new tools to examine unresolved elements of how rotavirus and other infectious or inflammatory disorders generate illness.”
Matthew Rob is another contributor to this project.