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Adults with mild cognitive impairment are benefitted from aerobic exercise!

According to a new study by researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, adults with mild cognitive impairment are benefitted from moderate to vigorous-intensity aerobic exercise. Finding methods to help people with mild cognition is essential to help fight the rise in Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. The study found that memory function, cerebral blood flow regulation, cardiorespiratory fitness improved by one year of aerobic exercise in people with mild cognitive impairment.

According to Rong Zhang, Ph.D., a research scientist at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, a professor of neurology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and the study’s principal investigator, “Aerobic exercise is essential for improving both vascular function and brain function. The brain is a unique organ. It needs constant blood flow and oxygen supply.”

Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia are among the nation’s most significant public health threats. While this study didn’t look at reducing Alzheimer’s disease directly, it looked at helping people with mild cognitive impairment. Mild cognitive impairment increases the risk of developing dementia caused by Alzheimer’s disease or other neurological conditions. Experts have been trying to find ways to prevent all forms of dementia, including Alzheimer’s. Currently, there is no cure.

America’s population is ageing rapidly, so research on this subject has become more attractive. More than 10000 people turn 65 years old each day. One of the three seniors dies from Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia and kills more people than cancer. In the US, more than 6 million people over the age of 65 with Alzheimer’s disease. At the time of the pandemic, the death related to Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia rose to 16%.

Thirty-seven people ages 55 to 80 were observed by the researchers for this study with mild cognitive impairment. They were followed over 12 months period. The subjects participated in three brisk walking exercise sessions at the beginning of the study each week for 25 to 30 minutes. After week 26, exercise sessions increased to 4 to 5 times a week for 30 to 40 minutes.

The researchers found out that vigorous exercise had lots of health benefits for people with mild cognitive impairment. Exercise improved their cerebral blood flow regulation, cardiorespiratory fitness, memory, and executive function.

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